Inside Tulane Med: Quarterly News from the Tulane University School of Medicine

December 2013 Newsletter


School of Medicine embarks
on strategic planning

Dean Lee Hamm
Dean Lee Hamm
What will Tulane University School of Medicine look like in 7 years? 15 years? Dean Lee Hamm and school leadership are hoping to have a clear vision of the medical school's future by embarking on a strategic planning process called the School of Medicine Vision 20/20.

"We have unprecedented challenges in the future of academic medicine and it requires us to think creatively in order to solve these challenges. This process will help us identify our strategies for the long-term success of the School of Medicine," says Hamm. Read More >>


NFL Players Association taps
Tulane University to provide
medical services for former players

Dr. Gregory Stewart
Dr. Gregory Stewart
Tulane University School of Medicine has partnered with the NFL Players Association to provide medical services for The Trust, a new support program for former players, with an emphasis on overall health and successful transition from professional football.

"We are excited about the opportunity to help take care of former players who have given so much in their athletic careers," said Dr. Gregory Stewart, executive director of The Trust program at Tulane University. "We'll be a resource for full head-to-toe medical evaluations and ongoing support from a team committed to helping them develop and maintain a healthy brain and body." Read More >>


Israeli trauma experts help local ER
teams prepare for the unthinkable

Dr. Avraham Rivkind
Dr. Avraham Rivkind
Earlier this month, the School of Medicine co-hosted the New Orleans/Israel Partnership on Emergency Response and Medicine, a five-day conference that brought together crisis experts and emergency medical responders from New Orleans and Israel to share lessons in disaster response.

Dr. Avraham Rivkind, director of the trauma unit of Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, shared how Israeli emergency teams developed life-saving emergency response techniques to treat critical injuries from terrorist bombings and other deadly disasters. Read More >>


Study: High blood sugar makes
Alzheimer’s plaque more toxic
to the brain

Dr. David Busija
Dr. David Busija
High blood-sugar levels, such as those linked with type 2 diabetes, make beta amyloid protein associated with Alzheimer's disease dramatically more toxic to cells lining blood vessels in the brain, according to a Tulane University study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

"Previously, it was believed that Alzheimer's disease was due to the accumulation of 'tangles' in neurons in the brain from overproduction and reduced removal of beta amyloid protein," said senior investigator Dr. David Busija, regents professor and chair of pharmacology at Tulane University School of Medicine. "While neuronal involvement is a major factor in Alzheimer's development, recent evidence indicates damaged cerebral blood vessels compromised by high blood sugar play a role." Read More >>


Tulane child psychiatrist honored
with lifetime achievement award

Dr. Michael Scheeringa
Dr. Michael Scheeringa
The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) honored Tulane University child psychiatrist Dr. Michael Scheeringa with a lifetime achievement award for his pioneering research about the emotional and behavioral problems of very young children.

Scheeringa, who is the Remigio Gonzalez, M.D., Professor of Child Psychiatry at Tulane University School of Medicine, was given the AACAP's 2013 Irving Philips Award for Prevention, an honor for those who have made significant contributions to the prevention of mental illness in children and adolescents. Read More >>


Pathologist gets $2.6M in NIH
awards for hepatitis C research

Dr. Srikanta Dash
Dr. Srikanta Dash
Tulane University Pathology professor Dr. Srikanta Dash has been awarded two grants totaling $2.6 million to study why some patients respond and others develop resistance to standard treatments for chronic hepatitis C, the most common cause of end-stage liver disease.

Dash received a $1.4 million, four-year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to explore the mechanisms behind a gene, interleukin-28B (IL-28B), that plays a critical role in whether a patient with hepatitis C (HCV) responds to antiviral treatment. The second award is a $1.2 million National Cancer Institute grant to study how chronic HCV patients develop resistance to standard interferon therapies. Read More >>


Fat stem cells boost
breast cancer tumors

Bruce A. Bunnell
Dr. Bruce A. Bunnell
Tulane University researchers have found that fat stem cells obtained from obese women lead to greater cancer cell growth than fat cells from non-obese women. The findings are from a new study focusing on the impact of fat stem cells from different parts of the body on the growth of breast cancer tumor cells.

Dr. Bruce A. Bunnell, director of the Tulane Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine and lead author on the study, says: "This study demonstrates that the site of origin and body mass index alter the characteristics of human fat stem cells and their role in cancer progression." Read More >>


Tulane researchers get crowdfunded

Student researcher
Tulane researchers participate
in crowdfunding initiative.
Increased competition and diminishing federal research funding is making it more difficult for researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine to bring their scholarly endeavors to life.

The challenge has caused administrators at the School of Medicine to get creative. This month Tulane researchers will turn to the public and the Internet for help getting their projects funded. Through the crowdfunding platform Microryza, researchers will publicize their projects and hope that donors find the project worthy of funding. Read More >>

In This Issue

School of Medicine embarks on strategic planning

NFL Players Association taps Tulane University to provide medical services for former players

Israeli trauma experts help local ER teams prepare for the unthinkable

Study: High blood sugar makes Alzheimer’s plaque more toxic to the brain

Tulane child psychiatrist honored with lifetime achievement award

Pathologist gets $2.6M in NIH awards for hepatitis C research

Fat stem cells boost breast cancer tumors

Tulane researchers get crowdfunded

Department Spotlight: Urology

Inside Tulane Med Newsletter


Department Spotlight: Urology


Dr. Raju Thomas
From pioneering surgical technologies to offering highly specialized urologic care to hosting the World Congress of Endourology, the Urology Department is a leader in its field. "Tulane Urology is blessed with a unique set of faculty," says department chair Dr. Raju Thomas. "They work extremely hard on their goals of teaching, research, publications, being prominent in regional, national and international arenas, and delivering state-of-the-art clinical practice." Read More >>


Class Notes


See what your fellow School of Medicine alums are doing >>


Upcoming Events

School of Medicine
Class of 1964 Reunion

May 15-18, 2014
Download agenda >>
Email for more info: chayes@tulane.edu

Spring Reunions 1949, 1954, 1959, 1969, 1974, 1979, 1984, 1989, 1994, 1999, 2004, 2009
May 30-31, 2014
Email for more info: chayes@tulane.edu

CME Activities




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Tulane School of Medicine